Friday, August 24, 2018

Heat: the Next Big Inequality Issue   

PoliticsScience

Amy Fleming, writing for The Guardian: When July’s heatwave swept through the Canadian province of Quebec, killing more than 90 people in little over a week, the unrelenting sunshine threw the disparities between rich and poor into sharp relief. While … Continue reading →

Monday, July 27, 2015

A Quick Puzzle to Test Your Problem Solving   

Science

David Leonhardt, writing for The New York Times: We’ve chosen a rule that some sequences of three numbers obey — and some do not. Your job is to guess what the rule is. A great little logic puzzle.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Markets Brace for ‘Leap Second’   

FinanceScience

Bob Ivry and Yuji Nakamura writing for Bloomberg: Since 1967, when clocks went atomic, human timekeeping has been independent of the earth’s rotation. The problem is, the planet is slowing down and clocks are not. So every few years, to … Continue reading →

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

How Carpooling Will Save the World   

Science

Jason Goldman, writing for Conservation: The researchers started with a massive dataset: every trip taken by each of New York City’s 13,586 registered taxis that either started or ended in Manhattan in the year 2011. That gave them more than … Continue reading →

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Understanding the Birthday Paradox   

Science

Kalid Azad: In a room of just 23 people there’s a 50-50 chance of two people having the same birthday. In a room of 75 there’s a 99.9% chance of two people matching. Even after reading the article and understanding … Continue reading →

Monday, September 8, 2014

The Scientific 7-Minute Workout   

HealthScienceSports

Gretchen Reynolds, writing for The New York Times Magazine back in May 2013: Exercise science is a fine and intellectually fascinating thing. But sometimes you just want someone to lay out guidelines for how to put the newest fitness research … Continue reading →

Monday, August 25, 2014

Delay morning school start for teens   

Science

Andrew Seaman, reporting for Reuters: Middle and high schools should delay their start times to at least 8:30 a.m. to benefit the health and welfare of students, according to a new policy statement from a large organization of U.S. pediatricians. … Continue reading →

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

What two years on Mars did to the Curiosity Rover   

Science

Sean O’Kane, writing for The Verge: NASA’s Curiosity rover just recently finished its second year exploring Mars, and the red planet’s harsh environment has taken its toll. Rocky terrain, tricky sand dunes, and exposure to Martian dust storms have left … Continue reading →

Saturday, June 14, 2014

America dumbs down   

OpinionScience

Jonathon Gatehouse, writing for Maclean’s on a wave of anti-science, anti-intellectual thinking in the United States: If the rise in uninformed opinion was limited to impenetrable subjects that would be one thing, but the scourge seems to be spreading. Everywhere … Continue reading →

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Michelangelo’s David ‘risks toppling’   

ArtsScience

Italian news agency ANSA: Michelangelo’s statue of David risks toppling under its own weight, researchers in Florence warned on Wednesday. The National Research Council (CNR) and the University of Florence sounded the alarm after performing tests on 10cm plaster replicas … Continue reading →

Thursday, March 20, 2014

The Known Universe   

ScienceVideo

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most … Continue reading →

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Nuclear Fusion Reactions See Net Gain in Energy   

Science

Lisa Winter, writing for IFLScience: Using controlled nuclear fusion for a source of virtually unlimited power that is pollution-free has been a dream of physicists since Einstein’s day – but many had written the process off as science fiction. Though … Continue reading →

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Sealing off a radioactive sarcophagus   

Science

Nick Meo, writing for BBC News Magazine: Massive and glittering in the weak winter sunshine, a half-built arch looms over Chernobyl’s decaying industrial landscape of cooling towers and power lines. One of the biggest engineering projects in history, it has … Continue reading →

Saturday, August 10, 2013

Simulating One Second of Brain Activity   

Science

Derrick Harris writing for GigaOM: The hardware necessary to simulate the activity of 1.73 billion nerve cells connected by 10.4 trillion synapses (just 1 percent of a brain’s total neural network) for 1 biological second: 82,944 processors on the K … Continue reading →

Sunday, July 28, 2013

World’s Largest Solar Plant Ready to Shine   

Science

Josie Garthwaite writing for National Geographic: More than six years in the making, the Ivanpah plant is now slated to begin generating power before summer’s end. It was designed by BrightSource Energy to use more than 170,000 mirrors to focus … Continue reading →